Abuse victims say gun surrender laws save lives. Will the Supreme Court agree?

The U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear a case concerning gun-surrender laws in domestic violence situations. Janet Paulsen is living proof of what’s at stake. (Oct. 31)(AP Video: Sharon Johnson, David Goldman)Janet Paulsen passes a photo of herself as she slowly climbs the staircase at her home in Acworth, Ga., Tuesday, Aug. 8, 2023. Paulsen was shot six times when her estranged husband ambushed her in their garage in 2015 before he turned the gun on himself.

That changed a few days later when she said he tried to track them through a phone locator app, a violation of the protection order that prompted a misdemeanor charge, two hours in jail and a court order to confiscate his guns.

“It took me five years to get up the courage to divorce him, because I knew I would pay a price. And you know what happened when I did? He shot me,” said Paulsen, 53, a former property manager and endurance athlete who was left partially paralyzed in the 2015 shooting. headtopics.com

Scores of people seek protection in King County each week from domestic violence, stalking, school threats or other concerning behavior. When guns are present — as they are in about half of the cases in which domestic violence petitions are granted — the threat of injury or death is exponentially higher, and an interagency team can initiate a gun surrender under state law.

Meanwhile, some state courts are loosening firearm bans for other reasons. Gun surrender orders are on hold in at least five counties in Washington after a state appeals court said they violated a man’s Fourth Amendment right protecting individuals from improper search and seizures and Fifth Amendment right not to incriminate himself. headtopics.com

“Isabelle,” who asked that her real name not be published to protect her and her family, obtained a domestic violence protection order in a rural Washington county in May, but the judge refused to order her estranged husband to surrender his estimated 40 weapons. Her spouse was instead told not to “possess” them. But with no enforcement, Isabelle has no guarantees.

DeSantis wants Supreme Court to undo federal court’s pause on public drag banKaelan Deese is a Supreme Court reporter for the Washington Examiner covering the latest happenings at the nation’s highest court and the legal issues surrounding Second Amendment rights, abortion, and religious liberties. He previously wrote breaking news as a fellow for the Hill during the 2020 election cycle. Read more ⮕

U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in forfeiture case from SatsumaThe U.S. Supreme Court on Monday heard arguments from a Mobile County case that could determine what rights people have to property seized by police. Read more ⮕

Democrats plan to subpoena wealthy benefactors of Supreme Court justicesA vote is expected soon as Nov. 9 to authorize subpoenas for information from Texas billionaire Harlan Crow and from conservative judicial activist Leonard Leo. Read more ⮕

Senate Democrats plan to subpoena Harlan Crow and Leonard Leo over Supreme Court justices’ travelSenate Democrats say they will subpoena Republican megadonor Harlan Crow and conservative activist Leonard Leo for more information about their roles in organizing and paying for luxury travel for Supreme Court justices Read more ⮕

Senate Democrats plan to subpoena Harlan Crow and Leonard Leo over Supreme Court justices’ travelSenate Democrats say they will subpoena Republican megadonor Harlan Crow and conservative activist Leonard Leo for more information about their roles in organizing and paying for luxury travel for Supreme Court justices. Read more ⮕

Senate Democrats plan to subpoena Harlan Crow and Leonard Leo over Supreme Court justices’ travelSenate Democrats say they will subpoena Republican megadonor Harlan Crow and conservative activist Leonard Leo for more information about their roles in organizing and paying for luxury travel for Supreme Court justices Read more ⮕